Myanmar talks peace while its troops gangrape and murder minority Kachin women



‎Myanmar‬: NOT serious about peace. 

Troops gang-raped and killed 2 Kachin ‪Baptist‬ ‪Christian‬ missionary women in church just yesterday.

Spread the word.

From a 100% reliable Kachin Independence Army friend:

Dear Friends,

I couldn't sleep tonight when I spoke with Laiza.

Two Kachin Baptist Missionaires were gang-raped and beaten to death by Burma Army. I have emailed the incident to American Baptist Gen Sec.

Jan 19, 12pm, soldiers under Maj Aung soe Myint from LIB 503 gang-raped and beat to death two Kachin Baptist Church volunteers Maran Lu Ra 20 and Tangbau Hkawn Nan Din 20 at the church compound in Kawng Hka Shabuk village west of Nam Tau and Nbaw Pa Road, Northern Shan State. Images attached."

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Zarni's remark:

Sign ceasefire or we will rape, kill and brutalize your women!

That is a real message. 

The following is a public relations spin - by Min Aung Hlaing, the Commander in Chief of Myanmar Tatmadaw (feudal army).

"This depends on the armed ethnic groups. Do they really want peace? If they really want peace, there is no reason why they should not get it. If they wish to go along the path of democracy, and if they have the desire to bring unity and development in their region, they can choose this path. We cannot keep arguing. Disputes hinder the country's development."

- Senior General Min Aung Hlaing to Singapore's official mouthpiece Channel News Asia

‪‎Myanmar‬'s #1 General Min Aung Hlaing: 
Talking "peace" while raping and killing ethnic minority women.

The father Brigadier Min Gaung (initially Than Maung, who was a hire-hand in my late grandfather's mini-"casino" in Mandalay before he joined the army) was involved in the early wave of Rohingya genocide as Commander of Western Command based in Sittwe, capital of Rakhine State.

Now the son is talking peace while his troops are raping and murdering ethnic minority women - this time Kachin Baptist missionaries - with complete impunity.

Myanmar Tatmadaw has been raping and killing minority women for decades - with impunity. The military leadership at the highest level KNOW and CONDONE the practice, in effect.

Rape of women in 'enemy territories' is used as a matter of strategy at worst and tolerated at best in many a military around the world.

Myanmar Tatmadaw's use of rape of ethnic minority women - hundreds of them - has been well-documented by Shan Women Action Network, Kachin, Chin, Karen and other ethnic minority human rights network.

Millions have been spent by Western governments such as USA, UK, Australia, etc. on organizing 'human rights and other civil-military workshops' with Myanmar officers.

It doesn't look like the workshops are having any appreciable impact on the Myanmar military's use of rape as part of its implicit military strategy to bring the target resistance groups - referred to as 'insurgents', the obsolete anti-Communist Cold War vocabulary which continues to be used by mindless academics and journalists.

This interview by Channel News Asia, Singapore's mouthpiece helps promote the Burmese military's spin: we want peace, but the ethnic groups are flouting the rules and undermining peace process! Singapore is NOT alone in piling pressure via the media and/or $. Japan, Norway and EU governments have also resorted to various strategies to persuade the oppressed to accept Myanmar regime's offer of peace - near total surrender - so that these external interests can get on with whatever their own un-declared agendas: peace and development again are NOT real objectives for the 'donors' and 'peace supporters'. There is no free lunch in international relations.

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Channel News Asia: Myanmar peace process in rebel hands: army chief

YANGON: Myanmar's military has suggested that ethnic armed groups may not be fully committed to end the civil war in the country. In an exclusive interview with Channel NewsAsia, its Commander-in-Chief Min Aung Hlaing accused some ethnic groups of flouting the rules, which has resulted in clashes with the military.

In a sign of how volatile the situation is, fresh clashes between the ethnic Kachin Independence Army and the government military erupted a few days ago. But the Myanmar government is still keen to sign a national ceasefire agreement with key ethnic armed groups next month.

Ethnic armed groups have been fighting the government military in Myanmar for 60 years. Their demands are clear - they want political equality and the right to self govern. As minority communities, these ethnic groups have often felt unfairly treated - their rights as citizens ignored. 

Several violent conflicts have occurred over the years. One such incident in 2011 between the Kachin Independence Army and the government military in the northern state left more than 100,000 people homeless. Many remain housed in temporary camps today.

Recent negotiations between the ethnic armed groups and the government have calmed the situation somewhat and reduced the frequency of clashes. The aim of the talks is to have the groups sign a nationwide ceasefire pact. But sporadic battles still occur, hampering negotiations.

Senior General Min Aung Hlaing said: "This depends on the armed ethnic groups. Do they really want peace? If they really want peace, there is no reason why they should not get it. If they wish to go along the path of democracy, and if they have the desire to bring unity and development in their region, they can choose this path. We cannot keep arguing. Disputes hinder the country's development."

The Nationwide Ceasefire Co-ordinating Team (NCCT) agrees the agreement will push Myanmar forward. And the team, which represents 16 major ethnic armed groups, is determined to end the conflict.

Dr Lian Sakhong, a NCCT member and Chin National Front Supreme Council member, said: "We are truly committed for peace. We're truly, truly committed for national ceasefire agreement. Look, we're the ones who proposed and drafted this nationwide ceasefire agreement text. As soon as President Thein Sein came to power, we issued a statement, calling for a dialogue, calling for a ceasefire agreement."

Two issues remain a challenge: the future of ethnic armed groups and the government's commitment to continued political dialogue after the ceasefire pact has been signed.

The ethnic armed groups believe it will be more realistic to sign the ceasefire agreement in early April, rather than in February as President Thein Sein has hoped. Failing to do so, however, will result in wasted efforts and jeopardize the entire negotiation process as the country may see a change in administration after this year's general elections.

In an exclusive interview with Channel NewsAsia, Myanmar's military chief accuses some ethnic armed groups of flouting the rules, resulting in clashes with the government military.

Exclusive interview video can be viewed here


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