Cambodia's Khmer Rouge Tribunal: one model for a combined national and international judicial mechanism

Cambodia's Khmer Rouge Tribunal: one model for a combined national and international judicial mechanism


Presentation by Dr Helen Jarvis, Former Chief of Public Affairs and of the Victims Support Section of the ECCC


The final quarter of the 20th century witnessed enormous changes in the international political landscape with the ending of the Cold War and the collapse of the Soviet Union. Alongside this political realignment, a new cloth of international humanitarian and criminal law and justice began to be woven – cloth whose warp and weft are still being changed, and whose colour is by no means permanently fixed.

One thread among many in this new cloth was the establishment of the Extraordinary Chambers in the Courts of Cambodia (ECCC) in February 2006, following many years of failed attempts to achieve justice, geopolitical manoeuvring and tortuous and difficult international negotiations.[1]

Against this background of emerging possibilities for international justice and domestically amid the final stages of the disintegration of the Khmer Rouge in June 1997, the Cambodian government requested the United Nations to provide assistance in finally holding accountable the top Khmer Rouge leaders who had masterminded massive human rights violations some twenty years before.

 


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