Buddhist Nationalism in Burma: How Institutionalized Racism led to the Genocide of Rohingya Muslims, Tricycle, Spring 2013



Buddhist Nationalism in Burma: How Institutionalized Racism led to the Genocide of Rohingya Muslims, Tricycle, Spring 2013 by Maung Zarni

For those outside Burma, the broadcast images of the Theravada monks of the “Saffron Revolution” of 2007 are still fresh. Backed by the devout Buddhist population, these monks were seen chanting metta and the Lovingkindness Sutta on the streets of Rangoon, Mandalay, and Pakhoke-ku, calling for an improvement in public well-being in the face of the growing economic hardships afflicting Burma’s Buddhists. The barefooted monks’ brave protests against the rule of the country’s junta represented a fine example of engaged Buddhism, a version of Buddhist activism that resonates with the age-old Orientalist, decontextualized view of what Buddhists are like: lovable, smiley, hospitable people who lead their lives mindfully and have much to offer the non-Buddhist world in the ways of fostering peace.
 

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